Thursday Morning News

Another report from Bloomberg says Apple is looking to build devices with touchless gesture controls and curved screens. While being able to hover your digits over a phone screen and have it do things would be pretty cool, a number of other smartphone manufacturers already make devices with slightly curved displays, and while the iPhone X’s OLED display falls into the latter category, curved phones may only be a few years away.

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Wednesday Morning News

IFixit’s teardown of the sixth-generation iPad doesn’t really give us any new info about the regular iPad that now supports the Apple Pencil, probably because we already know pretty much everything there is to know about Apple’s newest iPad. There’s a new Broadcom touch screen controller that is likely responsible for making the Apple Pencil work, everything is held together by glue, and it’s pretty much like the iPad before it, at least in terms of the overall hardware and other physical dimensions.

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Tuesday Morning News

Bloomberg is reporting this morning that Apple plans to use their own chips in Macs from 2020, replacing Intel CPUs. It’s said Apple is already in the beginnings of the move, which will likely involve a transition period of a few years. On the upside, the move away from Intel will allow Macs and iOS devices to work similarly and more seamlessly, with less of a development gap needed for iOS and macOS apps.

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Good Reads for March, 2018

Every month, we’ll be bringing you a selection of spectacularly scrumptious — if slightly longer — reads about the wonderful world of Apple. Sometimes these will be reflections on a decade of iPhone programming, a look at the HomePod’s place in the home, or forgotten stories about Apple’s video game console. All I know is, bring your own Instapaper account, because this is Good Reads.

  • Early on in March we saw the tenth anniversary of the iPhone SDK. The Iconfactory’s Craig Hockenberry tells us about how it was when it all started, from jailbreaking the original iPhone to see what could be accomplished outside and ahead of the official SDK itself, lamenting the original proposition of slow, JavaScript-based apps versus the speed and power of the native apps of the time, and the iPhone’s very first Twitter app. Now, iOS development is a lucrative business in and of itself, with an audience of millions.

The iPhone SDK was promised for February of 2008, and given the size of the task, no one was disappointed when it slipped by just a few days. The release was accompanied by an event at the Town Hall theater. Ten years ago today was the first time we learned about the Simulator and other changes in Xcode, new and exciting frameworks like Core Location and OpenGL, and a brand new App Store that would get our products into the hands of customers.

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Thursday Morning News

Speaking to Recode’s Kara Swisher and Chris Hayes from MSNBC, Apple CEO Tim Cook has commented on the Facebook and personal data privacy debate, saying that Facebook should have regulated itself. Now, it’s too late for late, and while Apple could have done similar things with customer data by monetising personal information, Apple’s product isn’t the customer. That in itself should say everything you need to know about Apple’s business models.

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Wednesday Morning News

Apple’s education-centric event in Chicago has all wrapped up, and you’d be crazy to think there weren’t a bunch of education-focused announcements. For starters, Apple has introduced a new Everyone Can Create curriculum so teachers can integrate new methods of creative learning into their existing lesson plans. There’s a couple of parts to it, which are broken down by MacStories; Schoolwork is a new app that helps teachers manage student learning on iPad — Apple’s own learning management system, if you will — with a Mac version of the existing Classroom app coming later this year, and a new ClassKit framework and API for developers to create educational third-party apps.

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Tuesday Morning News

The New York Times has a report on Apple’s push into original video programming. They claim that if everything goes to plan, we’ll be watching TV shows on some kind of Apple platform by this time next year, with Apple’s streaming video service slated to launch around March 2019. Apple SVP of Internet, Software, and Services Eddy Cue said at SXSW earlier this month that although Apple knows how to create apps, do distribution, and marketing, they don’t really know how to create TV shows.

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Monday Morning News

Apple’s March 27th education event this week reportedly won’t be live-streamed, but the rumour blogs seem to have a pretty good idea of what we’ll see at the event anyway. The first Apple event for the year and Apple’s first education-focused event since 2012 is expected to bring a cheaper iPad and the possibility of a cheaper MacBook Air, although the only real educational news might be the release of iOS 11.3 with ClassKit and an updated Classroom app for teachers to lead students through lessons. We’ll see how it all shakes out on Wednesday.

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Friday Morning News

The Spring collection of Apple Watch bands includes colourful new options for a range of bands across the board. The Woven Nylon bands now alternate white stripes with colours for a fresh new take, with new colours for the Sport Band, Sport Loop, and and Classic Buckle, and for the first time, the Nike Sport Loop will be sold separately. New Hermès bands also feature an accent colour.

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Wednesday Morning News

The Financial Times reports Apple now has 45 permits to test self-driving vehicles in California. That’s up from the 27 permits that Apple had just a few short months ago, and 9to5Mac points out that it’s also more than Uber’s 29 permits, and even Tesla’s 39 permits. We still haven’t heard anything about Apple’s plans for self-driving cars, despite rampant speculation the company had moved from manufacturing its own electric self-driving vehicle to autonomous driving and driving experiences to be integrated into other vehicles.

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