Benny Ling

Wednesday Morning News

There’s new developer betas for all of Apple’s upcoming software releases, with the third beta of iOS 12, tvOS 12, watchOS 5, and macOS Mojave all seeing the light of day this morning. It seems as though AppleInsider’s post originally suggested a macOS Mojave beta was available, but the article was since updated to say that wasn’t the case, despite a third macOS Mojave beta being available according to several sources.

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Tuesday Morning News

GeekBench results for what’s purported to be one of this year’s iPhones give us some idea about the hardware specs of the device. The benchmarks say that at least one iPhone will have an A12 processor with 4GB of RAM, with modest performance boosts over the current crop of iPhones, including the iPhone X, likely due to minor processor architecture changes.

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Monday Morning News

Apple is rebuilding Maps from the ground up, starting with San Francisco and the Bay Area with the next beta of iOS 12 and expanding to Northern California by the official release. In an interview with TechCrunch, Apple SVP of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue said the company has already done a lot of work since the mediocre launch of Maps six years ago, and the work Apple is putting in now to reduce their reliance on third-party data and building out their own mapping data will hopefully, one day, make it the best maps app in the world.

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Good Reads for June, 2018

Every month, we’ll be bringing you a handful of very valid, if slightly longer, reads about the wonderful world of Apple. Sometimes these will be stories about little-known teams within Apple, discussion about the part design plays in both Apple’s products and others, or yet another post on using an iPad Pro as your primary computing device. All I know is, bring your own Instapaper account, because this is Good Reads.

  • Like many of us, Paul Stamatiou had used tablets before. And just like many of us, he never really got into them, finding their utility to be constrained — not quite as mobile as a phone, or as useful as a laptop. But after a few months using Apple’s largest tablet, he’s come to really enjoy the hardware and the software combination of an iPad Pro running iOS 11 — while multitasking features like Split View let you view more than one thing at a time, the iPad’s strengths lie in how effortless it becomes to focus on one particular task.

Even with all this new multitasking functionality, there’s one thing that still feels different compared to using a desktop OS. Doing anything on the iPad Pro is a focused experience. There’s no way to accidentally multitask. It’s a conscious effort you have to make. And even if you have two apps open in Split View, they’re taking over the entire screen and there’s nothing else that can distract you. No other apps partially in view in the background, no badged or bouncing apps in the dock trying to get your attention.

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Friday Morning News

A paywalled article from The Information suggests Apple could bundle its as-yet-unreleased streaming video service with a number of other services, including news content, Apple Music and iCloud storage. It makes a lot of sense to offer an all-in-one package deal across all of Apple’s services, especially if that’s a subscription that keeps people coming back month after month, year after year.

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Thursday Morning News

MacRumors has the latest research note from Ming-Chi Kuo about Apple’s product roadmap for the end of this year and well into 2019. A quick skim says it’s nothing you haven’t heard before, with new iPads, a MacBook Air, and Apple Watch all expected to be released this year, alongside the three new iPhones that the Apple rumours have been discussing for months now. There’s also some great new updates on the horizon for Apple products in 2019, but we’ll have to wait a few months to see what those will be.

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Wednesday Morning News

With this morning’s release of the macOS Mojave public beta joining yesterday’s release of the iOS 12 and tvOS 12 public betas, Apple’s beta software program website is the place to be if you plan on downloading and installing pre-release software. Macworld points out the usual caveats apply, at least when installing the iOS 12 public beta, but it’s largely the same for the macOS Mojave public beta: for any device that you rely on, strongly consider the cost of things not working as you’re used to, or not working at all.

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Monday Morning News

Following months of complaints about the reliability of its laptop keyboards, Apple has started a keyboard service program for MacBook and MacBook Pro models released after 2015. It’s about as close as we’ll get to an official admission that Apple knows there’s an issue with the old and new butterfly switch designs, and while The Outline points out that individual key or whole keyboard replacements may not fix the issue permanently, the silver lining is that if you own or are planning to buy one of the affected machines, you’ll be covered for keyboard issues for up to four years after the first retail sale of the unit.

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Friday Morning News

Apple is getting into children’s TV programming. Variety reports the company is teaming up with the non-profit educational organisation Sesame Workshop to create new kids’ programming that will not include Sesame Street. Instead, the two will be developing their own live-action and animated series, as well as a puppet series, adding another feather in the cap of Apple’s series of original programming.

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Wednesday Morning News

Yesterday, the ACCC announced the Federal Court had ordered Apple to pay $9 million in penalties for misleading customers about their rights under Australian Consumer Law when dealing with faulty iPhones and iPads. The issue dates back to the “Error 53” saga, where the initial release of the iOS 9.2.1 update disabled some devices which had had third-party repairs performed. Affected users who then sought repairs were then refused service or otherwise led to believe they were no longer entitled to repair coverage, either out-of-warranty or otherwise.

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